Mortgage Lenders

Reviewing the UK’s best mortgage providers

To buy a home, you’ll need to borrow money from a mortgage lender. It used to be the case that you’d have to go to a building society to get a mortgage, but these days most banks offer mortgage products for home owners.

In fact, there are more than 90 mortgage lenders on the market, who together offer over 11,000 deals. You might hear mention of 'major lenders' and 'specialist lenders'.

Major lenders include what’s commonly referred to as ‘The Big Six’ - that’s Lloyds (including Halifax), Nationwide, Santander, RBS, Barclays, and HSBC - because these six lenders collectively account for the majority of all mortgage lending in the UK.1

Specialist mortgage lenders

Specialist lenders, such as Kensington and Aldermore, offer mortgage deals suitable for those who are self-employed or with poor credit histories.

Self-employed mortgage lenders

Historically it's been more difficult to get a mortgage if you're self-employed, but these days many lenders are more lenient about lending money to those in this situation.

For example, if you've saved enough for a good sized deposit, have a healthy credit rating, and have up to two years accounts showing a steady income, you'll likely have a chance of getting a mortgage with one of these lenders.

For those who don't have a large despoit, perfect credit history, or years of accounts available, there are specialist lenders who will also consider lending to you.

Bad credit mortgage lenders

If you don't have a great credit rating, this doesn't immediately mean you're not going to be eligible to get a mortgage. However it may reduce the number of lenders willing to assess your application.

If you're worried about your credit rating, it's worth sharing a copy copy of your credit report with your mortgage broker so they can look into which lenders might be most suitable to consider when searching for the right deal.

While there are lenders who are happy to help those with more severe credit issues, they'll typically offer less competitive deals with higher interest rates.

Help-to-buy mortgage lenders

There are many lenders who provide mortgages for those using the help-to-buy government scheme, such as Natwest, Nationwide, and HSBC.

It's important to remember that you'll need to apply for the equity loan directly on the government website to secure the funding for the deposit.

When picking a lender, your mortgage broker will be able to confirm the details of the equity loan, how this impacts your application, and the implications for when you remortgage in the future.

Online mortgage lenders

Online lenders, such as Digital Mortgages, are newer entrants to the market. They typically provide residential mortgages, but offer a purely digital experience rather than using call centers or branches.

Bear in mind that you'll need a smartphone available to apply. This applies to all applicants to the mortgage.

The benefits of using an online mortgage lender generally include a faster service that traditional non-digital lenders, and having the status of your application available at the click of a button.

Top mortgage lenders

When it comes to finding you a mortgage, we'll always search the market for the most suitable deal for your specific circumstances.

However, it's useful to know which lenders receive the least number of complaints, which process applications the quickest, and which will lend the most based on your income.

For example, knowing that Barclays and HSBC took an average of 22 days to process applications for our customers over a 12 month period (the longest of the 'big six' lenders) might encourage you to start the application process a little earlier than planned.

So we've captured this data and more, to give you an idea of which lenders are top for these criteria and prepare you for a future application.

Choosing the right lender for your needs

As we’ve seen, many lenders provide loans to help you buy a residential home, while some cater for those looking to purchase a buy-to-let property. Others cater for first-time buyers, and those with other more specific needs. Some cater exclusively to those with poor credit history, for example.

We’ve also seen that thousands of mortgage deals are offered between between them. This is to accommodate the wide-ranging needs of today’s home owners, which vary more than ever before; working later in life, having more flexible jobs, or receiving financial assistance from family - to give just a few examples.

While there are many types of lender, choosing the right one needn’t be complicated. A mortgage broker like Trussle will always make sure they recommend a suitable deal from the right lender for your needs.

Common questions about mortgage lenders

This information was last updated on 16th July 2018

Which mortgage lender lends the most?

Each lender will assess your circumstances against their own criteria, meaning the answer will be different for everyone. The important thing to remember is that that you should be looking for the most suitable mortgage deal offered by a wide range of lenders on the market. A mortgage broker like Trussle can help you with this.

What documents do mortgage lenders typically need?

Lenders will typically ask for three months worth of bank statements and payslips, a photo ID, and an address ID. Depending on your credit score, they may also ask for a copy of your credit history.

Will a mortgage lender help me with a bad credit score?

A number of mortgage lenders specialise in lending to those who may not have the best credit history. Speaking with a mortgage broker will help you find the most suitable specialist lender for your circumstances.